How do I know if I have enough pre-requisite to develop an Android App?

Native Android Apps are written using Java. You need to have enough knowledge of Java to ensure that you can write a decent Android Application.

You can use the following check list to ensure you have enough Java skills:

1. Can you write a Java class?
2. Do you know how to create an Object?
3. Can you create a method and invoke it from another class?
4. Can you read the API document?
5. Can you extend or implement?
6. Can you override and/or overload methods?

If the answer is yes to majority of the above, you have the pre-requisite to start with Android Apps development.

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How do you get the best salary at your next Job?

salary-negotiation-tips1. Research what you are worth – Look at the job portals, industry publications and check with your friends to get an idea on what your skills and experience is worth. e.g., It is not uncommon to see Java developers are paid anywhere from $40 to $90 or even higher depending upon their experience, skills and job locations.

2. Let the employer give you an offer first – You do not want to be the one who gives the number, as your salary expectation may be under par. Specially, employees coming from some outsourcing companies have salary on the lower side of the market rate. You should let the employer give you an offer first.

3. Ready to provide a counter offer – If your research suggests that you can get a better deal, be open to convey it in a polite manner. You should also have a strategy on what happens is the employer does not accept your counter offer.

4. Don’t be lazy – Sometimes people take whatever comes their way. Please spend some time to explore where you want your career to go and if the new compensation fits with your career path and goals.

5. Don’t overlook extras – If you can not get the base salary changed, explore if there is an opportunity to get better deals on bonus, insurance, healthcare, flexible work hours and other perks.

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How to fix Eclipse Tomcat not starting in 45 seconds

Generally this error indicates that there is some issue with Tomcat Server configuration in Eclipse. Best way to fix this would be to completely remove server and its reconfiguration and add it again to Eclipse.

Steps below will describe how to accomplish this.

1. Open the Servers Tab from Windows>Show View>Servers menu

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

2. Right click on the server and delete it

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

3. Create a new server by going New>Server on Server Tab

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

4. Click on “Configure runtime environments…” link

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

5. Select the Apache Tomcat v7.0 server and remove it. This will remove the Tomcat server configuration. This is where many people do mistake – they remove the server but do not remove the Runtime environment.

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

 

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

6. Click on OK and exit the screen above now.

7. From the screen below, choose Apache Tomcat v7.0 server and click on next button:

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

8. Browse to Tomcat Installation Directory

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

9. Click on Next and choose which project you would like to deploy:
Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

10. Click on Finish after Adding your project

Sansa Technology Professional Training - Fixing Tomcat issue with Eclipse

11. Now launch your server. This will fix your Server timeout or any issues with old server configuration. This solution can also be used to fix “port update not being taking place” issues.

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How do I set JAVA_HOME?

1. Go to My Computer> Properties

2. Go to Advanced Tabs and Click on Environment Variable Button

3. Under System Variable section, Click on the new button to a new variable.

4. Enter variable name as JAVA_HOME and variable value as your JDK installation directory (e.g., C:\softwares\Java\JDK1.6.0_23)

 

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How do I create a List in Android?

1. Following are the key steps in creating a Simple List.

A.  Extend ListActivity. This provides capability to set content of the list from a datasource, such as a String Array.

                         public class ListSimpleDemoActivity extends ListActivity {

                         B. Create an ArrayAdapter using a String Array

                         String[] elements = getElements();

                         //Create an ArrayAdapter

                         ArrayAdapter<String> arrayAdapter = new ArrayAdapter<String>(this,

                       android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1,

                       elements);

C. Set ListAdapter by providing your ArrayAdapter

                         this.setListAdapter(arrayAdapter);

D. onListItemClick responds to when you click on an item. It can be used to perform any action. E.g., In this example we will create a toast that shows the current time and a message.

                         protected void onListItemClick(ListView l, View v, int position, long id) {

2. Your completed Activity class should look like the following:

 

package com.sansatechnology.listsimpledemo;

 

import java.util.Date;

 

import android.app.ListActivity;

import android.os.Bundle;

import android.view.View;

import android.widget.ArrayAdapter;

import android.widget.ListView;

import android.widget.Toast;

 

public class ListSimpleDemoActivity extends ListActivity {

 

           

            /**

             * This method is executed when the activity is created

             *

             * @see android.app.Activity#onCreate(android.os.Bundle)

             */

            @Override        

            public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

                  super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

 

                  // Get the elements for the list

                  String[] elements = getElements();

                 

                  //Create an ArrayAdapter

                  ArrayAdapter<String> arrayAdapter = new ArrayAdapter<String>(this,

                              android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1,

                              elements);

                 

                  //Set the elements using List Adapter

                  this.setListAdapter(arrayAdapter);

                 

                             

            }

           

            /**

             * This method will be triggered when you pick up an item from the list

             *

             */

            @Override

            protected void onListItemClick(ListView l, View v, int position, long id) {

                  super.onListItemClick(l, v, position, id);

                   

                 

                  Object o = this.getListAdapter().getItem(position);

                  String element = o.toString();

                 

                  Toast.makeText(this, “Time now :”

                              + new Date()

                              + “\n I like ”

                              + element, Toast.LENGTH_LONG)

                              .show();

                 

                 

            }

 

           

            public String[] getElements() {

                  return new String[] { “Pizza”, “Burger”, “Burrito”, “Biryani” };

            }

 

      }

2. Go to your project and Right click to run as an Android Project.

3. You should see your application working as:

Sansa Technology Android Training simple list example image 1

Sansa Technology Android Training simple list example image 2

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Android Training Series: TableLayout and a ListView in Android Technology

Sansa Technology Android Training

Sansa Technology Android Training

Many Android Trainees ask me about the difference between a TableLayout and a ListView in Android Technology. I thought I would provide a quick explanation:

Content or items provided by TableLayout do not respond to an event, such as click, Unless they were a clickable items to start with.

However in the case of ListView every item is clickable. You can attach item selection listeners to it to respond to a user action.

You should consider using ListView when you want your user to perform some tasks. Where as, Table Layout will be a good place to display content.

If you want to learn more about Android technology, Join Sansa Technology’s Android Training Program. Visit us at http://www.sansatechnology.com or email contact@sansatechnology.com

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What’s the next big thing in Software Industry – What we learnt from Tiecon 2011.

We just spent two days at TieConn2011 at Santa Clara Convention Center. It was an amazing collection of entrepreneurs and technology leaders.
We had the opportunity to hear from Steve Case (Co-Founder of AOL) , Sal Khan (Founder of the Khan Academy) and Vinod Khosla (Founding CEO of Sun Microsystems) – All these speakers were as impressive as they appear in their resume’. Khosla especially sounded extremely confident and presented his cool ideas to fix the world energy issues.

Even more what we found surprising was the direction technology is moving to – Many of the industry leaders absolutely believed that mobile applications and payments are going to the next big things. They believed that the mobile applications is still in “phase 0” phase and the new ideas are going to completely transform the mobile industry.

The other interesting part was to hear and meet with executives who manage cloud computing industry. It will be extremely interesting to see how the cloud based services will transform the IT industry.

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How to Set up Path Variable on your Computer

1.      Go to My Computer icon and right click to get menu options. Click on properties.

2.      Under System Properties, go to Advanced Properties Tab. Click on Environment Variables button.

3.      You will see the following environment variable screen.

4.      Scroll down to System Variable called “Path”

5.      Click on Edit button after selecting Path. Add your path (e.g., I have added jdk1.6.0_18 bin path) at the end of variable value after semi-colon.

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A Practical Introdcution to Subversion

By Sagar
Software Engineer


Overview

This document provides a brief tutorial on using Subversion. I’m using this to document the SVN tools as I learn to use them, and tips for administering an SVN repository. This is not intended to be a replacement for the SVN documentation, but rather a quick howto on using SVN.

Using SVN we can work as a team anywhere within a system, intranet or even internet. It keeps track of each activity done on each file with basic information like who made the changes, when and what changes been made. We can easily compare the different version of files. And many more.

Installing SVN

I’ll focus on TortoiseSVN as it is a really easy to use Revision control / version control / source control software for Windows. It is based on Subversion. TortoiseSVN provides a nice and easy user interface for Subversion.

It is developed under the GPL. Which means it is completely free, including the source code. But just in case you don’t know the GPL too well: you can use TortoiseSVN to develop commercial applications or just use it in your company without any restrictions.

Since it’s not an integration for a specific IDE like Visual Studio, Eclipse or others, you can use it with whatever development tools you like.

Download the Subversion interface from http://tortoisesvn.net/downloads and install it.

After you’ve gotten Subversion installed by following the instructions, Now we need to do either of the following.

1.     Create a new Repository – To create a new repository  or

2.     Do SVN Checkout using  URL for repository.


Managing repositories

Subversion manages branches a bit differently than CVS; there’s a good document (SVN for CVS users) at the Subversion site. You should read that. The long short of it is that you have to restructure your directories a little bit before using Subversion. Caveat: this restructuring isn’t neccessary, and the following tree hierarchy isn’t neccessarily the best. However, while the documentation isn’t clear on this subject, it implies that if you don’t do this (or something like this) you may encounter difficulties later when you try to do branches.

Say you have a project that is laid out:

myproject/

index.html

src/

docs/

images/

Before you import the project into Subversion, you should restructure the hierarchy so that it looks like this:

myproject/

tags/

branches/

trunk/

index.html

src/

docs/

images/

You do this because to create a branch “sometag”, you’ll copy trunk/ to branches/sometag.

Anyway, after you’ve moved things around, make sure you’ve deleted any extraneous files, such as *~ and .*.swp. Make sure to delete those CVS directories, or they’ll end up in the repository. Then, in the parent directory of “myproject”, run the command: svn import http://yourhost/svn/repos myproject myprojectDon’t forget the last argument, or else all of the files in myproject will be dumped into the main SVN repository directory… at the top of the hierarchy. To check out the project, use: svn checkout http://yourhost/svn/repos/myproject/trunk -d myproject. This will check out only the “trunk” subdirectory into “myproject” on your machine. You can then work in this subdirectory.

Other commands

Here are common commands I’ve used so far; they operate, for the most part, just like their CVS counterparts, with a few differences (and the power of SVN is in those differences).

  • help — use svn help <command> to get very terse help on any command.
  • commit — just like CVS commit
  • checkout — see the instructions above for an example. Does what CVS checkout does, but with different arguments.
  • update — just like CVS update, although the results are different. See the subversion documentation on the website for more information.
  • delete — deletes a file or directory. Unlike CVS, this really deletes directories. You won’t see the changes in your working directory until you commit and update.
  • status — a useful version of the CVS status command. Works offline and produces human-readable output.


Overview

This document provides a brief tutorial on using Subversion. I’m using this to document the SVN tools as I learn to use them, and tips for administering an SVN repository. This is not intended to be a replacement for the SVN documentation, but rather a quick howto on using SVN.

Using SVN we can work as a team anywhere within a system, intranet or even internet. It keeps track of each activity done on each file with basic information like who made the changes, when and what changes been made. We can easily compare the different version of files. And many more.

Installing SVN

I’ll focus on TortoiseSVN as it is a really easy to use Revision control / version control / source control software for Windows. It is based on Subversion. TortoiseSVN provides a nice and easy user interface for Subversion.

It is developed under the GPL. Which means it is completely free, including the source code. But just in case you don’t know the GPL too well: you can use TortoiseSVN to develop commercial applications or just use it in your company without any restrictions.

Since it’s not an integration for a specific IDE like Visual Studio, Eclipse or others, you can use it with whatever development tools you like.

Download the Subversion interface from http://tortoisesvn.net/downloads and install it.

After you’ve gotten Subversion installed by following the instructions, Now we need to do either of the following.

1.     Create a new Repository – To create a new repository  or

2.     Do SVN Checkout using  URL for repository.


Managing repositories

Subversion manages branches a bit differently than CVS; there’s a good document (SVN for CVS users) at the Subversion site. You should read that. The long short of it is that you have to restructure your directories a little bit before using Subversion. Caveat: this restructuring isn’t neccessary, and the following tree hierarchy isn’t neccessarily the best. However, while the documentation isn’t clear on this subject, it implies that if you don’t do this (or something like this) you may encounter difficulties later when you try to do branches.

Say you have a project that is laid out:

myproject/

index.html

src/

docs/

images/

Before you import the project into Subversion, you should restructure the hierarchy so that it looks like this:

myproject/

tags/

branches/

trunk/

index.html

src/

docs/

images/

You do this because to create a branch “sometag”, you’ll copy trunk/ to branches/sometag.

Anyway, after you’ve moved things around, make sure you’ve deleted any extraneous files, such as *~ and .*.swp. Make sure to delete those CVS directories, or they’ll end up in the repository. Then, in the parent directory of “myproject”, run the command: svn import http://yourhost/svn/repos myproject myprojectDon’t forget the last argument, or else all of the files in myproject will be dumped into the main SVN repository directory… at the top of the hierarchy. To check out the project, use: svn checkout http://yourhost/svn/repos/myproject/trunk -d myproject. This will check out only the “trunk” subdirectory into “myproject” on your machine. You can then work in this subdirectory.

Other commands

Here are common commands I’ve used so far; they operate, for the most part, just like their CVS counterparts, with a few differences (and the power of SVN is in those differences).

  • help — use svn help <command> to get very terse help on any command.
  • commit — just like CVS commit
  • checkout — see the instructions above for an example. Does what CVS checkout does, but with different arguments.
  • update — just like CVS update, although the results are different. See the subversion documentation on the website for more information.
  • delete — deletes a file or directory. Unlike CVS, this really deletes directories. You won’t see the changes in your working directory until you commit and update.
  • status — a useful version of the CVS status command. Works offline and produces human-readable output.
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Tips for creating a perfect cover letter

By Joy Sarkar
Placement Lead, Sansa Technology

A cover letter can be a helpful tool to highlight your skills. Use a cover letter to show how your skills are appropriate for the job. A cover letter can also be used as a marketing tool – think of it as your personal sales brochure! You should use a cover letter anytime you use a resume.
Can I use one standard cover letter on each of my applications?
You will need to submit a separate cover letter with each set of application materials. Since the cover letter is a way to help interest employers in your skills and how they are suited to the particular job, it is a good idea to customize your cover letter for each position that you are applying for.

What information do I include in my cover letter?
Identify the job for which you are applying. Include the title and vacancy number.
Mention where you found out about the job (newspaper ad, web page, etc.). If you were referred by someone, mention that person.
Briefly highlight your skills and experience. Don’t include all of the information found on your resume.
Tell the hiring supervisor what he/she will gain by hiring you.
Close the letter by stating what you would like to happen next. Mention where you can be reached by phone or email.

What format do I use?
Your cover letter should be in standard business letter format.

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